ON THIS DAY : THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS

Posted on Friday 14th October 2016


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ON THIS DAY

THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS, 1066


14 October 1066 marks the 950th anniversary of the infamous Battle of Hastings, fought on Senlac Hill, seven miles from Hastings between the Norman-French army of William, the Duke of Normandy, and an English army under the last Anglo-Saxon King, Harold Godwinson.


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A painting showing the events of Hastings, inspired by Tom Lovell

Photograph from www.angelfire.com

The Norman conquest of England was the 11th Century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy. King Harold II was defeated by the Norman forces of William the Conqueror on this day 950 years ago.




"William achieved victory at Hastings after he had gouged out his eye with an arrow"

It was a long, bloody, all-day battle that claimed the lives of many soldiers and amongst them was King Harold himself. The Bayeux Tapestry, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England, suggests that King Harold was killed by William the Conqueror and recorded that 'William achieved victory at Hastings after he had 'gouged out his eye with an arrow'. The Battle raged on until all of Harold's loyal bodyguards were slain. William was truly then known as 'The Conqueror'.


On Christmas day 1066 Archbishop Ealdred of York crowned William, the King of England.

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A small section of The Bayeux Tapestry, taken from google.

The Bayeux Tapestry is an embroidered cloth almost 70 metres long and 50 centimetres tall. It's beautiful detail depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England and is one of the supreme achievements of the Norman Romanesque. The tapestry still remains completely intact after more than nine centuries with it's exceptional colour and miraculous craftsmanship making it a very endlessly fascinating piece of history.

3 FACTS YOU DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS...


The first man recorded to be killed in battle was William the conqueror's jester, Taillefer!

In France, The Bayeux Tapestry is sometimes referred to as the Tapestry of Queen Matilda.


During the battle, it was thought that both sides took a break for lunch...


Professor Robert Bartlett describes the Norman victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. BBC Two.

Of further interest...