Warfare in News

Image

Posted on Wednesday 30th May

Over a million people are expected to watch the largest public event of the Diamond Jubilee, the Thames Diamond Jubilee River Pageant, which will take place on Sunday, 3 June.

A 1,000-strong flotilla of ten types of boats carrying 20,000 people will pass under all 13 Central London river Thames crossings, from Battersea Bridge to Tower Bridge, taking at least 75 minutes to pass any given point.

The flotilla will be led by the Royal Jubilee Bells, a musical barge featuring a 12-tonne floating belfry, whose 8 specially cast bells - named after members of the Royal family - will peal continuously, echoed by churches along the river and throughout the UK. Followed by the Royal Rowbarge Gloriana, with Olympic gold medallists Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Matthew Pinsent as oarsmen. This will be followed by craft carrying the flags of the Comonwealth nations and a 22-strong orchestra form the Academy of Ancient Music.

The Royal Squadron will follow, with the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh traveling on board the Royal Barge, complete with thrones, resembling the richly decorated 17th and 18th century royal barges.

Around 50 of the Dunkirk Little Ships, vessels used during the Dunkirk evacuations will follow the Royal family, then Historic and Service vessels including the RN Steam Cutter 438, which was built during Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The rest of the flotilla will include working boats, leisure boats and fire boats, narrow boats and passenger boats, with a range of musical accompaniments.

More than 100 ships too tall to pass under the bridges on the route will be moored downstream of Tower Bridge, forming a mile-long Avenue of Sail. Vessels will include Amazon, which was present at Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Fleet Review, and Boadicea, a 19th-century oyster smack, and tall ships.

For more information on other events being held over the Diamond Jubilee weekend, here is a guide.

Further Reading

Dunkirk

Only £9.95

Dunkirk

(Paperback)
by Patrick Wilson

The miracle of Dunkirk. The defeat that was a triumph. Overwhelmed by the German blitzkreig the British Expeditionary Force somehow extricated itself, less gigantic quantities of equipment and over 300,000 troops, to our island fortress to fight another day. That much is well known. But, as the author fascinatingly reveals, many myths surround the momentous days and hours when Britain's future hung in the balance.

There was much more to the Dunkirk… Read more...


Of further interest...




Barnsley News from Barnsley Chronicle